Animals

Characteristics and personality of the Dalmatian dog breed

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  • Height at the cross: from 50 to 61 cm
  • Weight: about 20 kg
  • Cap: white mottled black
  • Average life: twelve years
  • Character: alive, affectionate
  • Relationship with children: Excellent
  • Relationship with other dogs: good
  • Aptitudes: service dog
  • Space needs: You can live inside the house but you need to run
  • Dalmatian Feeding: about 400 g of complete dry food
  • Maintenance cost: means, medium

The answer to the question: «Why the Dalmatian? »Is, at first glance, quite easy. Because those spots carry something else with them. Because they have a very lush and extraverted personality. Because we have seen 101 Dalmatians and we want a dog like Pongo or Perdita.

It's true, the Dalmatian He is a beautiful dog, with a different appearance and a wonderful and sociable personality. Anyway, if your impressions about race are based on what you have seen in a movie, you still have many more things to learn. If you find yourself baffled by the idea of ​​bringing home an adorable puppy with spots, it's time to look beyond the spots. To be a responsible and informed owner of a dog, and that implies dogs of any breed, it is not enough to decide to add a dog to your family for the mere fact that you have seen one on television and found it beautiful. Dogs are dogs and, in reality, the specimen you bring home will not behave like perfectly trained animals used on television and in movies. All this is commented not to deter the potential owner of a Dalmatian, since they are truly wonderful dogs. Yes, they are wonderful dogs, although they are not the perfect dog for everyone. This information is provided to provide the potential owner with important facts related to the Dalmatian. So, read on, and if this dog is truly the breed made for you, we wish you enjoy a long and full life with your new spotted friend.

Physical characteristics

Let's start with the obvious points. The Dalmatian It is one of the best known races and the reason is obvious: the spots, of course. From a purely aesthetic point of view, stains are what make a Dalmatian Be a Dalmatian. Although stains are the beauty marks of DalmatianThey are not, by far, the most important physical characteristic of the breed in terms of their condition.

The Dalmatian It is a medium sized dog and has an athletic looking body. A Dalmatian In a good way it is a beautiful thing to see, with neat and clean lines. Remember that Dalmatian It was designed as a working breed, and the fact that they are not used to perform those tasks is no excuse for obese dogs and those that are not fit. Although most of the Dalmatian they would run all day if they could, regular and not excessive exercise, just to maintain a Dalmatian Healthy in good shape.

In general, the Dalmatian It should be a balanced and well proportioned dog. It should not possess a single exaggerated characteristic. These are essential characteristics for a dog that needs to use energy efficiently for maximum resistance.

The Dalmatian It is not a long-haired breed (although it is known that there are Dalmatian long coat), although the length of the hair varies from dog to dog. The coat should be smooth and, considering that at Dalmatian It does not need a complicated grooming routine, the potential owner should know that the coat changes. White hairs on his black sweater, black hairs on his white sofa ... of course: this is a small inconvenience compared to the joy that his Dalmatian, but it is something that, in any case, must be taken into account. The hair that is moving can be kept under minimum with regular brushing.

Personality

Exuberance, energy and love. All of them are suitable words with which to describe the Dalmatian. It is a race with a true enthusiasm for life and that enjoys getting involved in all kinds of activities. He is intelligent and very trainable, although sometimes he is stubborn, and he can learn to do almost anything and do it well. Despite this, the most important thing is to participate in activities with its owner. Of course any Dalmatian he will appreciate the opportunity to run through the garden and thus spend some energy, but prefer to have a playmate. A race, a walk, play with a frisbee ... Dalmatian He loves to do all kinds of things and especially enjoys when these activities also involve spending some time with his owner.

The love that he Dalmatian Feeling for people may seem surprising, considering that the breed had its origins as a working dog and that, due to the nature of its tasks, developed a certain air of independence. This independent attitude can sometimes be shown through the tendency of the Dalmatian to "explore" if left unattended. Although sometimes it seems as if the Dalmatian they had a mind of their own, they are, in fact, very people oriented. The Dalmatian They show a strong loyalty and a great affection towards people, especially towards their owners.

Remember that even if the work of the Dalmatian as a dog that accompanied the carriages they made him, in some way, independent, since he had to be trusted to carry out his work without having to constantly receive orders from his master, he grew up being accustomed to accompany Your master to all sites. Add the affection of the race for people to their intelligence and you will find that Dalmatian They adapt extremely well to people's moods. It seems as if they understand how their owners feel and can modify their behavior accordingly. If you want to play, the Dalmatian will collaborate happily. On the other hand, if there is something that worries you, the Dalmatian You will feel equally happy snuggling at your side to show your support.

Some false beliefs about Dalmatian They are that they are hyperactive and difficult to control dogs. Well, this can be said of any dog ​​of any breed that lacks discipline and training. What happens is that it seems to be more evident in particularly active races. It's true: the Dalmatian They are dogs full of energy and need activity, so anyone considering a Dalmatian I should be prepared. This is an inherent feature of the breed and owners should not expect a Dalmatian Cheerfully accept being confined in a small place with no space to run. Training should begin at an early age and should be strictly enforced. A dog that is, by nature, full of energy and lacks discipline, is a totally undesirable combination, so it is no surprise that a Dalmatian untrained can give one a bad impression of the breed.

The Dalmatian It is not the type of dog that should be left out all day. Same as Dalmatian He likes to exercise a lot. He also likes to spend time inside the house, being part of the family. He likes to participate in everything that happens in his family, whether it is to spend an afternoon in front of the TV or the hustle of getting ready for the new day. It is a good pet for families with children, provided that children have been educated on how to treat a dog properly. The energy of a child makes a good match with that of Dalmatian.

It is also often thought that the Dalmatian It is a bit aggressive with other dogs. But, this is also a function of its original role as a protector of horses and carriages. If a homeless dog approached, it was the task of the Dalmatian Get him away from there. Aggression towards other dogs is easily avoided by early and constant sociabilization. Still, the natural guardian instinct of Dalmatian It can be an advantage at home, since you can count on it to bark as a warning if something is not going well.

Coexistence

Dalmatians feel very comfortable in the company of people and if they are left alone too long they adopt destructive behaviors or become depressed. This dog is for someone who wants to spend time with a pet.

Dalmatians also need to do a lot of exercise to dissipate their inexhaustible energy. They are probably not suitable for residents in flats, unless the family agrees to take long walks or daily runs. The best place where a dalmatian can live is one where he can play and run.

This breed has been subject to a passing popularity for its cinematic appearances, this fact however, caused the over-exploitation of the breed to breed mediocre dogs that live in homes not suited to their needs. The incidence of deafness in this breed is also high, which can lead to communication problems. Too many Dalmatians end up in protection centers because they don't act like the dogs in the movies.

Although most of us when we see a striking Dalmatian with spots we think of the stars of the Disney movie 101 Dalmatians, the true story of this breed is more varied.

Although he knows with certainty where this breed originated, the Dalmatians owe their name to Dalmatia, a coastal area that was formerly part of Austria. It is believed that these dogs are descendants of the Pointer.

They became popular in the 19th century, when they were used as car dogs to jog alongside carriages and protect these and horses from other dogs and threats. They have also been sentinels in wars, circus performers and hunters, as well as fire station pets. The Dalmatians we know today are mainly pets.

Here are the most important characteristics about the Dalmatian dog breed:

1. History
Its origin is not very clear, although the most likely theory is the one that speaks of the Dalmatian being descendant of the Bengal Braco, a race disappeared today. Around this ancient race revolves a fantastic and a bit mysterious story. Its origins are still unknown as we already mentioned and many regions dispute the paternity of the race, among which are Dalmatia (Croatia) and England.

Several witnesses confirm the existence of the Dalmatians already in Roman times and in ancient Greece. In a little more recent times, the success in the diffusion of this race is due to the English nobles. The original appearance of this dog gave horse-drawn floats a touch of elegance and distinction.

At the beginning of the 19th century, the image of the Dalmatian's float companion was so widespread that it was called Coach dog.

The British at that time selected the best specimens of white cloak with black spots. However, the Dalmatian name refers to Dalmatia, a region of the former Yugoslavian that corresponds to present-day Croatia.

The first unofficial standard of the breed was introduced by an Englishman, Vero Shaw, in 1882. In 1890, with the formation of the first Dalmatian Club in the United Kingdom the standard became official. When the dog with distinctive marks was first shown in England in 1862, it was said that it had been used as a guard and companion dog by Dalmatian nomads. The unique mantle of the breed became popular and widely distributed in the continent of Europe from 1920. Its unusual maras were frequently mentioned in the ancient writings on cynology.

His most important role has been as a companion dog and escort for carriages, which is reflected in his great endurance and athletic body. Additionally, its use as an escort for fire carriages gave rise to its relationship with this profession, which is still in force today, although now it is only one passenger in a fire truck.

In 1955, the FCI recognized Croatia as the place of origin of the Dalmatian.

2. Physical appearance
The Dalmatian is one of the best known races and the reason is very obvious: the spots, of course. From a purely aesthetic point of view, the spots are what make a dalmatian a dalmatian. Although the spots are the beauty marks of the Dalmatian, they are by no means the most important physical characteristic of the breed in terms of its condition.

This breed of dogs is made up of animals of good musculature, of medium size, with great resistance, and has a body similar to Pointer. A dalmatian in good shape is something beautiful to see, with neat and clean lines. Remember that the Dalmatian was designed as a working breed, and the fact that they are not used to perform those tasks does not make any excuse for obese dogs and those that are not fit. Although most Dalmatians would run all day if they could, regular and not excessive exercise is enough to keep a healthy Dalmatian in good shape.

In general, the Dalmatian should be a balanced and well proportioned dog. It should not possess a single exaggerated characteristic. These are essential characteristics for a dog that needs to use energy efficiently for maximum resistance.

The legs are round with well-arched fingers and the nails are white or the same color as the spots. The truffle (nose) is the same color as the spots. The eyes are dark paprika or amber. The ears are soft, tuning towards the tip, they are bent over themselves falling forward. The higher the definition of the spots, their distribution and size equitable (large spots on the spine becoming smaller towards the groin) the more valued the dog will be.

Appearance: This is a very well balanced dog, distinctively mottled, strong muscular and active. With a symmetrical profile, free from coarseness and heavy movement, as an old car dog, it is capable of great resistance and good speed.

Important proportions:
-Body length: height at the cross = 10: 9.
-Height to the elbow joint: 50% of the height at the cross.
-Height of the hocks: 20-25% of the height at the cross.
-Length of the head: about 40% of the height at the cross.
-Length of the skull: snout length = 1: 1.

Head: The head should be in proportion and harmony with the rest of the body and not very wide in the area of ​​the skull. The length from the occipital protuberance to the top and from the top to the tip of the nose is equal to 1: 1, or the snout slightly shorter. The upper line of the skull and the upper line of the snout are slightly divergent. The cheek bone should not be too developed. The head must be completely wrinkle free.

Tail: Reach approximately to the hock. It is strong at its root, thinning towards the tip and free of coarseness. Insertion neither too high nor too low. At rest it falls with a slight upward curve in the last third of the tail. On the move it is carried higher, slightly higher than the upper line, but never carried stopped or curled up. Preferably mottled.

Fur: The Dalmatian is not a long-haired breed (although it is known that there are long-haired Dalmatians), although the length of the hair varies from one dog to another. The coat should be smooth, short, shiny, hard, dense and considering that the Dalmatian does not need a complicated grooming routine, the potential owner should know that the coat changes. The hair that is moving can be kept under minimum with regular brushing.

Colors: The background color is pure white. Black spotted variety with black spots, liver spotted variety with brown spots. The ads should be placed symmetrically throughout the body, well defined and without intermingling in the white background color. The size of the spots should preferably be uniform, with a size of 2 to 3 cm in diameter. In the brown variety, the spots are slightly smaller, about 2 cm. The spots on the head and legs should be proportionally smaller than in the rest of the body. It is desirable that the tail is not too stained, with spots also smaller than in the rest of the body. Splashes in the body are not desirable and should be penalized. Ads should not be mixed forming large spots. Patches and color areas are not desirable. The spots on the ears should be especially noticeable.

3. Character and temperament
The specimens of the Dalmatian breed are usually sensitive, energetic, exuberant, cheerful and affectionate. All of them are suitable words with which to describe the Dalmatian. It stands out for being sociable, loyal and maintaining a very close relationship with the adoptive family and their owners. In addition, they are also very active, and can present a marked destructive behavior inside the home and therefore are not recommended for those living in the apartment. Dalmatian dogs they adapt better to living in wide spaces and require routine exercise, especially in regard to their obedience, since despite being dogs that like to have everything under control and control over their environment under control, they usually show a good response to obedience training . Another characteristic of the Dalmatian breed's behavior is that its specimens like the game, although they are somewhat abrupt and not very patient with young children.

They love to do activities and walks, because it has a great physical resistance. While it is somewhat independent, he likes to spend time with his masters and studies people carefully.

It is a race with a true enthusiasm for life and that enjoys getting involved in all kinds of activities. He is intelligent and very trainable, although sometimes he is usually a bit stubborn, and he can learn to do almost anything and do it well. Despite this, the most important thing is to participate in activities with its owner. Of course, any Dalmatian will appreciate the opportunity to run through the garden and thus spend some energy, but always prefer to have a playmate. A race, a walk, play with a frisbee, etc., to the Dalmatian He loves doing all kinds of things and especially enjoys when these activities also involve spending some time with his owner..

A dog of Dalmatian breed can be an excellent companion for young and active people, and in fact It is a dog recommended for active and youthful people, who like a vigorous dog that can accompany them in their daily sports routine and take care of the house when they go to work. It is not advised to be adopted by older people or families with very young children, because it is very hyperactive and can hurt, unintentionally, when playing, jumping or running.

The love that the Dalmatian feels for people may seem surprising and inexplicable, considering that the breed had its origins as a working dog and that, due to the nature of its tasks, developed a certain air of independence. This attitude of independent can sometimes be shown through the Dalmatian's tendency to "explore" if left unattended. Although sometimes it seems as if the Dalmatians have a mind of their own, they are, in fact, very people-oriented.

Remember that although even the Dalmatian's work as a dog that accompanied the carriages made him, in some way, independent, because he had to rely on him to carry out his work without having to constantly receive orders from his love, He grew up being used to accompany his master to all places. Add the affection of the race for people to their intelligence and you will find that the Dalmatians adapt extremely well to people's moods. It seems as if they understand how their owners feel and can modify their behavior accordingly. If you want to play, the Dalmatian will collaborate happily. On the other hand, if there is something that worries you, the Dalmatian will feel equally happy snuggling at his side to show his support.

It is true that Dalmatians are dogs full of energy and in need of activity, so anyone who is considering having a Dalmatian should first be well prepared. This is an inherent feature of the breed and owners should not expect a Dalmatian to happily accept being confined in a small place with no space to run. Training should begin at an early age and should be strictly enforced. A dog that is, by nature, full of energy and lacks discipline, is a totally undesirable combination, so it is no surprise that a Dalmatian who is not trained can give one a bad impression of the breed.

The Dalmatian is not the type of dog that should be left out all day. Just as the Dalmatian likes to exercise, he also spends time at home, being part of the family. He likes to participate in everything that happens in his family, whether it is to spend an afternoon in front of the TV or the hustle of getting ready for the new day.

It is also often thought that the Dalmatian is a bit aggressive with other dogs. But, this is also a function of its original role as a protector of horses and carriages. If a homeless dog approached, it was the Dalmatian's job to get him away from there. Aggression towards other dogs is easily avoided by early and constant sociabilization. Even so, the natural guardian instinct of the Dalmatian can be an advantage in the home, since you can count on it to bark as a warning if something goes wrong.

4. Health Aspects
Some health problems that affect the Dalmatian are discussed here briefly, not to deter the potential owner or to alarm any new owners, but rather to offer them useful information. All Dalmatian owners and anyone thinking of becoming an owner should be aware of this information in order to keep their Dalmatians trouble free.

The deafness It is a problem that is usually associated with the Dalmatian. Although it is not a disease, because the dog does not feel pain or threatens its life expectancy (with respect to whether that dog was perfectly healthy), it is, however, a problem. A Dalmatian is born with the ability or not to hear. It is not something that can come when you get older. The best prevention is to buy the puppy from a reputable breeder who can offer documentary evidence that the puppy and its parents have been tested for the Auditory Response Caused by the Brain Stem (RAPTC) and have obtained a normal hearing result.

They are known for their uricotelic metabolism (In their urine they excrete predominantly uric acid as a waste product of nitrogen metabolism, the rest of mammals - including the rest of dog breeds - are ureothelic predominantly excreting urea), which, unfortunately, can lead to the formation of kidney stones and / or urinals, especially in male specimens.

The calculations They can be formed anywhere in the dog's urinary tract, from the kidney to the urethra, although the most frequent location is the bladder. The stones may cause mild irritation in mild cases, or may partially or even completely block the flow of urine in severe cases, making urination painful and in some cases compromising the dog's quality of life permanently.

The urinary tract infections and stones They pose another problem in Dalmatians, but not all dogs are affected. With proper prevention, even dogs with a tendency to have stones can live their entire lives without them.

Dalmatians have sensitive skin and tend to suffer allergies and other irritations, which manifest themselves in the form of skin problems. Most of them have treatment. The worst side effect is that, generally, the fur does not look healthy.

Other common problems in many dog ​​breeds also affect Dalmatians. These problems include the elbow dysplasia, hip dysplasia, gastric swelling or torsion, progressive retinal atrophy (APR), von Willebrand's disease, immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgA) and epileptic seizures.

Dalmatians properly cared for will have a tendency to live a long and healthy life without any of these problems. The best way to keep your Dalmatian healthy is to find a good veterinarian, preferably one who has experience with Dalmatians.

5. Food
The diet is similar to that recommended for people suffering from gout or kidney stones. A high quality natural diet, free of artificial additives and chemical preservatives is necessary to maintain the vitality and general well-being of the Dalmatian. Thanks to their unique uric acid metabolization and genetic propensity for the formation of urinary stones, Dalmatians need a diet rich in high quality protein, but low in purine content.

The diet has to be: low in purines (especially in animal proteins which metabolize uric acid in the body), moderate in high quality proteins (and lacking in sources of inferior quality proteins), high in carbohydrates Complex carbon (whole grains, fruits and vegetables low in purines that help the body get rid of excess uric acid), low in fat content, low in unnecessary fillers (which add few nutrients and for the most part result in increased stool size), and low in salt. This dietary balance helps promote alkaline urine and keeps uric acid under control.

In addition, it is necessary to mention that Some Dalmatians are allergic to flours and grains Various, such as soybeans, corn and wheat, potential allergens should be taken into account when planning the diet. Nutritional supplements such as: potassium citrate (for the prevention of calcium oxalate crystals) and sodium bicarbonate (for the prevention of cysteine ​​crystals) may also be recommended for dogs with a history or genetically predisposed to renal failure and / or Urinary stone problems

And finally, we must not forget that the same attention and scrutiny is needed with the treats and prizes given to the dog. Many treats contain an unhealthy combination of purines with a deficient content of meat or yeast by-products, as well as chemical preservatives, added salt, and other unnecessary ingredients. Avoid table leftovers, as much as possible, because they are high in purine content and excessive salt levels, which can negatively affect the pH balance in your dalmatian's urine, leading to stone formation

6. The ideal owner
The best type of owner for a Dalmatian is one who has plenty of time and patience to take care of a dog. This is not a race that can be allowed to act as it pleases. The Dalmatian has a type of personality that can be wonderful if it is molded so that his behavior is adequate, but it can be difficult to control if he is not taught how to behave.

Another positive feature for the owner of a Dalmatian is that it is someone who is, by nature, active and enjoys participating in a variety of things. The Dalmatian will be very happy if he participates in something with an owner, so if someone who is already active can accommodate the Dalmatian in his activities, he will establish a natural and mutual bond between them.

You can also read about: The lovely Collie dogs.

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